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Gunung Sewu’s Game-Based Training

Founded in 1953, Gunung Sewu is a group based in Indonesia that operates within a diversified range of work. From food, real estate, consumer, resources to insurance. With 30.000 workforces and growing, the Gunung Sewu Group had a need of a simpler yet more efficient way to teach their employees of the company’s code of conduct.  

Gunung Sewu’s Game-Based Training

To that end, some time ago, Agate had been requested to create a game—aptly named The Code—that would be implemented as a replacement for compliance training within the Gunung Sewu company. This game simulates some scenarios that can be found within the day-to-day work environment. It also aims to guide the player/trainee into learning for themselves: the appropriate mannerism needed to be taken in such a scenario in accordance with the company’s code of conduct. In this article, Agate team has the chance to have a conversation with Djonny Koesoemahardjono, the Compliance Director of Gunung Sewu Group about the impact of The Code for on delivering a different experience of compliance training.

When The Code’s development started off, what were your early expectations

Mainly that the audience will experience a different type of learning which is more engaging, challenging and fun. We expected that this newer experience would help to convey the message within the game to the users.

Where did the directives and instructions found in-game derive? 

Gunung Sewu’s Game-Based Training

The directives within the game were all derived from standard ethical values and principles, as well as what we thought was the ideal work culture would be as it embodies a day to day work activity.

In your own opinion, did you think the finished product was satisfying? 

It is satisfying. I think that the development team from Agate had really managed to combine the dreary and serious topic of compliance with the light and entertaining manner of a game. Thus, creating an ideal experience where even such a topic can be taken in with more motivation.

Would you say that the game had a good reception

In general, yes. However, we’ve noticed difficulties at first shown by generation X and older personnel that were just not accustomed to using gadgets or playing games. However, the ones who are willing to learn quickly adapted.

Did you find any difficulty to deploy the game

The difficulty is more on the technicality of the underlying system of the game and the infrastructure and/or computer system our own company has, which sometimes does not sync. Another issue is that some employees would need to use a standard phone charge to access the network and play the game.

What kind of insight that has been successfully gathered?  

The most valuable insight would have to be that the training’s message had been delivered much more easily. And the employees themselves seem to have taken a preference to the new system rather than their previous one.

 

Conclusion

Gunung Sewu’s Game-Based Training

It is not at all a surprise that the reception is as well as it is for this project. Game-based learning had always been a good way to engage many people in a topic that—at a glance—may seem dull. As what makes a game fun isn’t the topic itself but the mechanic.

Other topics that had been implemented for games that had taught unsuspecting kids many things about the world include: History like in Civilization series, Geography in Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego and even Economy and Business through various Tycoon games and so on. And if the younger minds that are so unfamiliar with the topic could be engaged and guided through it with a game, there is no reason as to why the same wouldn’t work with adults.

It should be mentioned however that these games meant for learning are more intricately tailored to what subject would be taught and should not be confused with Gamified Learning. A method meant to ease a more traditional way of learning with game mechanics such as the PBL (Point-Badge-Leaderboard) system and so on.

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