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Avoiding CRM Gamification Risks and Mistakes

At first glance, CRM gamification just sounds like a must-have, to the point that you would wonder if non-gamified CRMs have any value at all. And this is understandable, especially if you have already seen what good could actually come from it.  

But what you think is an overall improvement may actually be a backfiring trap if you implement gamification unto CRM without considering variables such as the environment, the product, customer base, the employee base and so forth. Below are some mistakes and risks and how to avoid them. 

Avoiding CRM Gamification Risks and Mistakes

 

Risks and Mistakes to gamifying CRM

Depending on what type of CRM, if you’re to sell CRM or use it no matter your company’s scale is, the risks of gamifying a CRM could vary erratically. And here we are, down the list we have gathered for you.

 

Risk of alienation

While it is true that essentially—once someone is into it—a gamified system could be something enjoyable, there are some customer base or employee base that would resent the idea of game-like factors within their work. Most likely, among the older generation of workers.  

These particular people that dislike the idea of gamification are often the ones that think that such measures are somewhat of a ridicule as it belittles. It somewhat has the potential to be perceived as though treating them like a child or mocking them outright. 

 Avoiding CRM Gamification Risks and Mistakes

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To avoid this problem is you just have to consider some things first. If you are a CRM manufacturer, think ahead, what type of business or company would you want your CRM to best cater to?  

At times, large corporate and formal offices wouldn’t be too keen on the idea of such a playful mechanic in their work, even if it actually benefits them, since they have to keep their formal image. At the same time, if you are in such a company, there are still odds that some of your employees feel that way as well. 

 

The mistake of bad design

As with any gamification attempt, there is the common mistake of bad design as well. Mainly how sometimes overly simplistic ‘gamification attempts’ such as simply adding points, badges, and leaderboards are thought to solve the problem. However, with only those three in place, it would not be a very good idea.  

It is true that those three elements of a game are a core mechanic to be used in gamification, but context is important, and one must fully flesh out the image they have in mind before implementing those powerful game-elements into the context they desire. 

 Avoiding CRM Gamification Risks and Mistakes

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To avoid this problem is that you either hire a consultant or conduct further research until you and/or your team are highly sure that your plans are sufficient. Remember to keep in mind that the desired behavior you strive for as you come up with the gamification design. 

 

Risk of reducing business complexity

A business in and of itself is complex by nature. It is meant to be that way because everything needs to be precise to optimize for maximal efficiency and pipeline.  

A known mistake of gamifying CRM is accidentally simplifying your business procedures. Albeit that might sound great and easier for the user, if the business process is cut down, so would the information that was to be acquired from that very process. 

Avoiding CRM Gamification Risks and Mistakes

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To avoid this problem is we must first acknowledge the fact that gamification isn’t there to simplify your CRM, it is there as a tool of engagement, to let the users feel less encumbered when using the system while keeping its complexity and intricacy of data flow optimal. 

 

And thus, were some of the few biggest risks and mistakes within CRM gamification. Though some of them might make it seem like CRM gamification is a bad thing, it is still an undoubtfully effective solution to use when the situation requires it. As the fundamentals of CRM itself is essentially flawed by something that gamification could easily fix. 

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